Bodywork Update 1

Simon White and Loren Wright – Bodywork and Aerodynamics

Once the chassis was complete the bodywork was able to be designed. This was done by drawing around the chassis in SolidWorks and making a number of cuts followed by other features such as fillets.

Two main factors were taken into account, driveability and aesthetics.
* In terms of driveability it was designed so there were no obstructions to the driver’s hands around the steering wheel and gear stick, and the side-pods only reach the height of the chassis so that when entering or exiting the car drivers do not damage the bodywork by applying any force to it. As well as this the bodywork hugs the chassis as closely as possible so that visibility for the driver is high.
* With regards to aesthetics the bodywork is designed to have flowing lines from the main nose into the separate side-pods. This flow will hopefully be highlighted with the use of a paintjob which is yet to be decided.

Complete bodywork

Complete bodywork

A couple of features were worked into the bodywork such as the open lower edge of the main nose (circled below). This is to allow the bodywork to be removed independently to the rest of the car, i.e. no suspension needs to be removed.  This will mean that adjustments can be made to the car in-between drivers, such as pedal assembly position, reasonably quickly.

Complete bodywork (side profile)

Complete bodywork (side profile)

Another feature to note within the bodywork is that it follows the angle of the infuser therefore removes a pocket which air would run into causing drag. This also allows for another mounting point for the underbody and hence keeps the underbody rigid.

The side-pods have also been designed to firstly allow the relevant components to be placed within them but to also kick the air up over the back wheels so that they don’t produce turbulence when the forward forward travelling air from the tyre clashes with the rear travelling air over the side-pod.

Complete bodywork (front profile)

Complete bodywork (front profile)

 

Suspension Update 1

Paul Kershaw – Front Suspension

Regarding the front suspension, the main features that have been designed are the wishbones, pushrods and shock-absorbers. After reverting back to using a pull-rod set-up, the shock-absorbers are now going to be placed inside the car. As long as the rules are still met and there are no clashes with other components, having the shock-absorbers inside the vehicle will allow for a lower centre of gravity and thus better handling.

Front suspension wishbones

Front suspension wishbones

The current bell-crank design is the seventh different version. Manufacturing costs, weight saving and variations in pivot-point coordinates have resulted in several different designs being produced. The bell-crank design will look almost identical to this one but small tweaks will be made to allow for the lowest possible cost and ease of manufacture.

Front suspension bellcrank

Front suspension bellcrank

The material for the wishbones has been purchased however a jig needs to be made to actually manufacture them. Once manufacture is underway, the spring rates of both the front and rear suspension need to be calculated. This is done to alter the stiffness of the car and affects whether the car will under-steer or over-steer.

 

 

 

 

Brakes and Uprights Update 2

Scott Hett and Jordan Gammie – Wheel assemblies updates

Both the front and rear Upright designs for the LR2014 Formula Student car have been subjected to stress analysis based around situations involving calculated cornering forces, braking forces and acceleration forces. In addition, an individual case involving both braking and cornering was completed for the front Uprights and accelerating and cornering for the rear Uprights, as a means of testing the worst possible scenario that the components could be expected to withstand. Even with the presence of safety factors on the forces used, both of the designs successfully endured each tested scenario. The Uprights have now been approved by our Design Committee and are to be manufactured by Autoy Ltd. out of 7075-T6 Aluminium (With huge thanks to them for their contribution to the manufacture of the LR2014 Wheel Assemblies).

Front and Rear uprights

Front and rear uprights

Stress simulations for front and rear uprights

Stress simulations for front and rear uprights

Furthermore, the Rear Stub Axles are underway, having also undergone stress analysis based on scenarios similar to that of the Uprights, with the Front axles to follow immediately upon the arrival of our 7075-T6 Aluminium order from Manchester Metals.

Front and rear stub axels

Front and rear stub axels

In terms of braking, our Wilwood PS-1 callipers have arrived for the front wheel assembly and our order with AP Racing for both the rear callipers and Master Cylinders is currently being processed with hopes to receive those before the end of next week.

Brake Callipers

Front brake callipers

Finally, our custom designed Steering Rack is currently undergoing manufacture and a CAD model has been supplied with great thanks to Titan Motorsport for this as well as their sponsorship.

Steering Rack

Steering Rack

 

Aerodynamics Update 1

Loren Wright and Simon White – Bodywork and Aerodynamics

Velocity contours of the simulation

Velocity contours of the simulation

Breaking news: the underbody is finally designed! Many hours have been invested into simulating the best configuration of the underbody in order to generate sufficient downforce to justify its addition to the car. After a term and a half of blood, sweat and too many tears, we’ve finally managed to generate a design which, according to the simulations, produces in the region of 250N-300N downforce. With the underbody weighing less than 10kg once manufactured (we hope!), this is a 20kg advantage we’re gaining by running it.

A bit of work is still required on the diffuser to stop the stalling of air that is occurring (as demonstrated by the dark blue shown in the Velocity profile results below), but this is more about little aerodynamic add-ons rather than modifying the design itself.

Velocity profile results

Velocity profile results

Mounting points for the underbody

Mounting points for the underbody

In order to ensure that the underbody doesn’t bend or deform when the car is running (thus deteriorating its performance), a lot of thought and work has gone into how it is going to be mounted to the car. There will be 8 main mounting points to the chassis (red circles) with 4 additional mountings to the bodywork, side-pods and rear tow bar, just to ensure that all parts are integrated.

Lancaster Racing is incredibly excited about the addition of aerodynamics to our car, and is optimistic that this, along with our other developments, will help us to become a competitive UK team in the competition.

We are also excited as this year we are endeavouring to manufacture the underbody ourselves in house using a technique known as Resin Infusion. More to follow on this once we’ve looked into it in more depth!

CAD model of final design

CAD model of final design